Is petroleum jelly not absorbed by our skin

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Q Is petroleum jelly not absorbed by our skin? Does it form a barrier that doesn’t allow moisture to penetrate, making our skin drier than before?

A Not true. Our skin gets its moisture from the lower layers of your dermis deeper in skin not from the environment. We have a constant flow of moisture from the lower layers of the skin to the outer layer. This is called trans-epidermal water/moisture loss. Your outer most layers comprise cells that are filled with hydroscopic material called natural moisturising factor. These cells are cemented in place with a complex mixture of lipids. The cells and lipids hold on to some of this moisture coming from the lower layers to ensure the skin stays soft and pliable. In the course of your skin’s exposure to the environment such as dry air, sun, hot water, washing and the sun your skin loses these lipids. When this happens, the skin can no longer hold on to the moisture needed, from the lower layers, so it dries out. Petroleum jelly does not actually penetrate skin, it fills these lipid holes, reducing the moisture loss and allowing skin to once again hold on to the moisture coming from the lower layers, returning skin to a soft and supple state.